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Skin Cell Bio Printer Could Help Burn Victims

skin cell printer

Another important advancement is on the way in the world of 3-D bio printing. Biomedical engineers at the Wake Forest University School of Medicine have created an inkjet bio printer that sprays skin cells over wounds, helping them heal more rapidly.

This incredible device uses a laser-equipped computer to scan and gauge the shape of the patient’s wound, and then delivers specially-crafted layer of skin cells to help heal infection-prone injuries such as burns. The printer also uses stem cells to encourage proper tissue regeneration.

So far, test results have been promising. Researchers at Wake Forest have teamed up with the U.S. Armed Forces Institute of Regenerative Medicine to find ways that the printer can be used to aid wounded soldiers.

Watch as Kyle Binder, a Wake Forest biomedical engineer, describes this amazing project:

YouTube Preview Image

[Reuters]

5 Responses to “Skin Cell Bio Printer Could Help Burn Victims”

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  2. […] fluffy new material composed of glass fibers could be the latest in wound-healing technology, say researchers from Missouri University of Science and Technology. This cotton candy-like […]

  3. […] at Canada’s Simon Fraser University have developed a printing method that produces nanoholes 1,500 times thinner than a human hair that can, like the morpho’s […]

  4. […] at Canada’s Simon Fraser University have developed a printing method that produces nanoholes 1,500 times thinner than a human hair that can, like the morpho’s […]

  5. […] at Canada’s Simon Fraser University have developed a printing method that produces nanoholes 1,500 times thinner than a human hair that can, like the morpho’s […]

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