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Meet Bo Yuan: Mining Engineering Student


Like most high school students, I didn’t know what career I wanted to pursue. A group of senior mining engineering students pointed me into the right direction. They told me: “If you like to play with big machines and to blow up stuff legally, then go into mining engineering.”

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No Toppling This Tower

Tokyo’s new 2,080-foot Sky Tree, the world’s tallest broadcast tower, is projected to draw 32 million visitors a year. But tourists won’t see one of its most striking features – a design intended to survive severe earthquakes and catastrophic winds.

Engineers began by studying soil formation as deep as 1.8 miles and taking meteorological measurements using a radiosonde balloon.

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Monster Mash Pumpkin Smash

What do Jack-O-Lanterns have to do with engineering? Plenty, if you’re among the scores who participate in the pumpkin drops and launch contests that many engineering schools host around Halloween! There’s even an annual World Championship Punkin Chunkin’ contest in Delaware that attracts kids and adults alike.

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Engineering Scholarships: A Giant List

Scholarships that target students interested in engineering provide an excellent way to help pay for the rising costs of higher education. Since engineering scholarships are plentiful and come from a variety of sources, such as corporations, non-profits, foundations, institutions, and governmental bodies, future engineers have a host of opportunities available to them.

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Get Fracking!

What’s relatively clean-burning, abundant, and possibly the next big thing in reducing America’s carbon footprint? Would you believe… natural gas? Vast reserves lie locked in the porous shale fields deep below Pennsylvania, Texas, and other states. But hydraulic fracturing, the technique used to extract the gas, has raised health and environmental concerns along with job prospects for petroleum engineers.

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