eGFI - Dream Up the Future Sign-up for The Newsletter  For Teachers Online Store Contact us Search
Read the Magazine
What's New?
Explore eGFI
Engineer your Path About eGFI
Autodesk - Change Your World
Overview E-tube Trailblazers Student Blog
  • Tag Cloud

  • What’s New

  • Pages

  • RSS RSS

  • RSS Comments

  • Archives

  • Meta

New Physics Simulator Makes Dirt Beautiful

Last year software engineers developed new ways for animators to mimic the movement of swaying trees, and this year another programmer has created a brilliant new physics engine.

The software, called Lagoa Multiphysics 1.0, was created by Thiago Costa, a programmer and technical director for Ubisoft games. Watch as it realistically simulates falling dirt, crumpling silks, and other animated marvels in the eye-popping demo below:

While these stunning graphics are currently too complex to run in real-time (e.g. during gameplay), they may soon be popping up in video game cut-scenes and in movie theaters near you.

[PopSci]

5 Responses to “New Physics Simulator Makes Dirt Beautiful”

  1. What they need to do is take the Lagoa Physics, create a hardware processor core on a 25nm process that can process enough simultanious threads at a high enough speed (Ghz) to handle a single object or material with enough ‘beads’, if the material requires (liquid), to be of sub-pixel size. And then make the die hold 20 or 30 of these cores.

    While in a game (or simulation) environment, it would in real time convert any object or material in question from regular vertex polygons in to Lagoa material, switch it to be handled by the Lagoa processor, and either overlay a point-to-point surface polygon for a texture, or recolor each point of the material to color itself to the nearest pixel color of the source texture. And when the material is no longer of importance or focus, return it to simple vertex.

    If wants their next big console to be graphically revolutionary, one would hope they fund and support an effort like this to jump start this technology in to real-time much sooner than expected. Lagoa Physics on a 3D 1080p display on a console that renders in 2160p downcoverting to 1080p at 240hz or 60 frames per eye per second, well that would be a marvel of graphics technology worth a jaw drop.

    Finally, imagine a game, you’re running through it, throw a grenade. The grenade goes Lagoa, and now it suddenly has true shrapenal physics. The shrapenal hits other items, which temporarily take on Lagoa physics to process the impact on their vertex models and add alpha layer adjustments to their textures, bump maps, etc. One of those pieces sparks a fire on an oil drum, while another piece of shrapenal hits an enemy. They fall in to the oil drum. Now there’s Lagoa physics processing the oil liquid inside the drum to determine how it moves and rolls, the fire can be processed in real-time, and oil starts spreading everywhere, in flames. Any oil that becomes stationary retires to a modified alpha layer on the affected surface or vertex 2D plain modeled after the Lagoa beads with as few polygons as possible, but the fire remains processed.

    One grenade just changed the entire dynamic of the level. And that’s just what popped in my head first. Lagoa physics could determine how Spidey would really shoot his web, how the blood would really flow from a cut from the god of war, how the metal would melt and drip to the floor as a lightsaber chewed through it mercilessly, or how that torpedo affected the atmospheric preassure of a gas giant throwing that Romulan vessel out in to the open to be pummeled by the Klingon aggressor. Every vertex material or effect would have a set of Lagoa material physics set, so that as soon as an interaction is made, it’s made realistically (or overdramatically) in real-time, creating unprecedented effects. Imagine your sandbox game with Lagoa. Imagine the difference in destructable environments. Imagine the future of gaming. It is Lagoa Multiphysics.

  2. “If wants their next big console”
    should have read:
    “If -insert game company here- wants their next big console”

    Apparently lesser-than and greater-than symbols are mistaken for HTML and are stripped from comments, instead of using simple PHP to switch them with < and >

  3. […] cineplex are made possible by sophisticated computer software created by engineers. Modeling the realistic textures and movement of such things as fur, hair and fabric, for example, takes serious computing power. […]

  4. […] cineplex are made possible by sophisticated computer software created by engineers. Modeling the realistic textures and movement of such things as fur, hair and fabric, for example, takes serious computing power. […]

  5. […] cineplex are made possible by sophisticated computer software created by engineers. Modeling the realistic textures and movement of such things as fur, hair and fabric, for example, takes serious computing power. […]

Comments or Questions?

By clicking the "Submit" button you agree to the eGFI Privacy Policy.